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Category: Paying Off Debt

Don’t Raid Your Retirement Accounts

Don’t Raid Your Retirement Accounts

Let’s be honest, we all run into a bad patch financially once in a while. We might lose our jobs, have extra expenses that we didn’t see coming, increased debt because of an illness or death in the family or sometimes we just plain overspend. In these situations, our immediate impulse is to get out of the jam as quickly as possible and if we don’t have the money saved in an emergency fund one of the impulses that people…

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Financial Goal by 50: Hit the Two Comma Club

Financial Goal by 50: Hit the Two Comma Club

I am sure all of you have heard about goal setting and how to reach your goals. I promise this post is not about that. There are all kinds of great advice about hitting your goals. That includes making them realistic, creating vision boards, starting with small things and working into larger items, etc. We all should try to have goals. I mean what is the point of life without having to live for some goal. And it doesn’t have…

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Public Service Loan Forgiveness Blues and Student Loan Face Punches

Public Service Loan Forgiveness Blues and Student Loan Face Punches

I have chronicled my student loan journey on this blog for the past couple of years. At first, I wasn’t in favor of doing Public Service Loan Forgiveness (see here, here). Then I finally saw the light and I enrolled. I even created a presentation about it for other folks that needed help (in other words I did a total 180). Mrs. ROB is also enrolled in PSLF even though she teaches part-time at multiple institutions. So our current problem…

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2nd Quarter 2017 Debt Repayment Update

2nd Quarter 2017 Debt Repayment Update

¬†Hey everyone! My apologies for being MIA for the past week or so, but I was presenting some research in the United Kingdom and just didn’t have time to post. However, my summer can start to get back to normal sort of. I have a lot of updates that I need to do on a variety of subjects, which I hope to do in the next couple of weeks, but one of those updates is how my debt payoffs are…

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Should I Invest in Real Estate?

Should I Invest in Real Estate?

*This post is updated from its original posting about six months ago. I have been thinking about buying real estate to add to my portfolio. I thought a multi-family home next door to us would come on the market as a foreclosure, but that isn’t going to happen. So I have been thinking about how else, if at all, do I get into real estate. So while this was a thought experiment 3 years ago I still think about it…

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Our House Is My Debt Piggybank

Our House Is My Debt Piggybank

I have written a number of posts about home ownership. Generally, I think owning a home is a good thing. However, there are a variety of costs that can make it more costly than renting depending on the situation. In fact, I have argued that if you can’t save or have trouble saving that you could view your home as “forced” savings. In other words, paying down the mortgage and the home value going up gives you the ability to…

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Earmark Extra Income Ahead of Time

Earmark Extra Income Ahead of Time

One of the favorite things my dad would always tell me was that when I had money it was “burning a hole in my pocket.” And in some respects that was/is true. I remember using my allowance to buy toys, food, and games or other items. I don’t remember saving a lot of my money as a kid. I mean I had a savings account, but when I went to college I had enough money for spending money, but that…

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Public Service Loan Forgiveness Storm Clouds, Part 2

Public Service Loan Forgiveness Storm Clouds, Part 2

A few weeks ago I wrote about the potential for storm clouds surrounding Public Service Loan Forgiveness. A program that Mrs. ROB and I are enrolled in that we can use to combat our student loan debt. The initial controversy stemmed from lawyers who worked at certain non-profit organizations but those organizations weren’t classified as 501 3(c)s, which were the specific non-profits covered by PSLF. Apparently, these lawyers were told that their jobs were initially covered by PSLF, but then…

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Using a HELOC as an Emergency Fund

Using a HELOC as an Emergency Fund

I have come to somewhat of an epiphany/understanding of my monetary self over the past few weeks. Part of this revelation was due to some recent financial trouble that we have had. That trouble stemmed from unexpected expenses that caused me, for the first time, in over 18 months to carry forward a balance on the rewards credit card that I use. In my past I have racked up credit card. Sometimes lots of it. I think right before I…

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Our/Your Savings Rate

Our/Your Savings Rate

  One of the things that financial planners and professionals constantly complain about is the low savings rates among Americans. The average saving rate in the United States is 5.7%, which is woefully under the 10-15% that people recommend you save for retirement/other things. In the ROB household, we are saving about 20-25% for retirement and I hope to kick that number up even further. However, is the 5.7% really the savings rate in America? How should we calculate it?…

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